EXHIBITIONS

Since 1931, the Palos Verdes Art Center Beverly G. Alpay Center for Arts Education has been enriching the cultural climate of the community.  Building a platform for arts engagement through exhibitions, arts education, and public programs,  PVAC provides audiences with sustainable and transformative experiences.  Showcasing a wide range of artwork, PVAC presents artists at all stages of their careers.  Related educational programming includes guided tours, catalogues, lectures and workshops. 

PVAC’s Gallery Hours
10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays
1 p.m. – 4 p.m. Sundays (except major holidays) 

Exhibition Tours
Available to schools and community groups. Tours can be arranged by contacting Gail Phinney at gphinney@pvartcenter.org or calling 310-541-2479, ext. 305.





Floating Man: The Sketchbook Drawings of David Rinehart

25 July - 14 September 2014
Opening Reception:  Friday, 25 July 2014 
Members and Friends Preview: 6-8 pm 
General Public: 8-9 pm


Featuring sixty watercolor landscapes, pen and ink drawings and sketches by David Rinehart, Floating Man is the first comprehensive exhibition of personal sketchbook drawings by this internationally known architect who currently resides in La Jolla, California.  A student under the renowned Louis I. Kahn at the University of Pennsylvania, he worked for several years in Kahn’s office. A frequent honoree of the American Institute of Architects, Mr. Rinehart received its National Honor Award for Design in 1996. His notable buildings include the East Wing of the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California. He was a principal architect at Anshen + Allen in Westwood, as well as a tenured professor of architecture at the University of Southern California.

Mr. Rinehart completed the sketchbooks during the first eleven months after being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease. He wished to express his feelings, his struggle and ultimately his acceptance through his art. “David’s sketchbooks are a marvel,” said Joe Baker, Art Center Director and Curator of the exhibit.” His efforts to articulate his feelings about himself and the world around him through his art are very personal, very moving, and ultimately uplifting.”

A fully-illustrated catalog accompanies the exhibition ($20/members - $25/non-members), as well as a series of programs in collaboration with the Alzheimer's Association - California Southland Chapter and the Palos Verdes Library District.



Yosemite #16, by Theodore Waddell, 2006


Contemporary Highlights from the Autry National Center

25 July - 14 September 2014
Opening Reception:  Friday, 25 July 2014 
Members and Friends Preview: 6-8 pm 
General Public: 8-9 pm

In recent years, the Autry National Center's collection has expanded to include a variety of important contemporary works that celebrate, question, and even challenge notions of what is traditionally considered "Western Art." Some artistic themes, such as land and landscape, draw from art historical predecessors and have continued into the present. Others have undergone a paradigm shift. In the contemporary Native art world, tradition melds with modernity to create new styles.

Contemporary Highlights from the Autry National Center showcases select works embodying these themes. Featured artists include landscape painters Theodore Waddell and Portuguese Bend Colony artist Dan Pinkham, as well as contemporary Native American artists Tony Abeyta, Jaune Quick-to-See Smith and the late Fritz Scholder.

This exhibition is curated by Paige Bardolph
Associate Curator, Autry National Center, Los Angeles




Wind Directions from Four Pouchoirs, by Helen Frankenthaler, 1970


Printing at the Margins: Printmaking and the Role of Identity in the 1970s

25 July - 14 September 2014
Opening Reception:  Friday, 25 July 2014 
Members and Friends Preview: 6-8 pm 
General Public: 8-9 pm
Sunday, 7 September, 2pm: Free Gallery Talk by curator Maddie Phinney

Rarely an artist’s main focus, printmaking in the first half of the 20th century was understood widely as ancillary to other media such as painting or sculpture. Printing at the Margins showcases the largely unexamined, yet critically important shift in the 1970s away from the dominant mode of painting toward a new reliance on the print. The artists in the exhibition, including such notables as Robert Rauschenberg, Helen Frankenthaler and Alexander Calder, illuminate the relationship between printmaking and identity by working outside the masculine-oriented purview of Abstract Expressionism. Because these artists remained at the margins of dominant art discourses, they resultantly had free license to experiment, acting as pioneers pushing the printed medium to new heights of achievement.

Curated by art critic Maddie Phinney, this exhibition includes selected works from a private collector and the PVAC permanent collection.